Thursday, 24 January 2013

ByteLight



How it Works :


A smartphone/tablet device demodulates the visible light signal via the existing cameras. The mobile device then consults a cloud-based server, which maintains an association of light identifiers, content, and physical location. A smartphone/tablet device demodulates the visible light signal via the existing cameras. The mobile device then consults a cloud-based server, which maintains an association of light identifiers, content, and physical location.


With a GPS system, satellites overhead broadcast radio signals that your phone receives. In a ByteLight system, lightbulbs act as satellites, using light to beam information to your phone.
Each ByteLight has an identifier (similar to a MAC address). It broadcasts this identifier through the light itself – kind of like Morse Code, but through light. 

ByteLight Mobile App :

Create a digital content wall that's actually "in" a physical location. Anyone can view or share photos, notes, or other content while they're in one of your ByteLight enabled spaces.

The Lights :

Each light sends a unique signal that only your phone can see. With thousands of lights in an enterprise, ByteLight can be used for mapping and directions. With just a couple of lights in a home, the ByteLight mobile app is an exciting way to experience this technology.

Custom Plugins :

Integrate with home automation, connect to social networks, or even create an augmented reality gaming experience - any of this can be enabled using ByteLight. We’ve created a web based plugin editor to get you started building any plugin you can think of.








Thursday, 10 January 2013

Flexible Displays Shown By Samsung At CES 2013

LAS VEGAS (AP) — By showing off a phone with a flexible screen, Samsung is hinting at a day when we might fold up our large phone or tablet screens as if they were maps.
The Korean electronics company provided a glimpse of such a device at a keynote speech Wednesday at the International CES gadget show in Las Vegas. It's an annual showcase of the latest TVs, computers and other consumer-electronic devices.
WHAT IT IS: Brian Berkeley, head of Samsung Electronics Co.'s display lab in San Jose, California, demonstrated a phone that consists of a matchbox-sized hard enclosure, with a paper-thin, flexible color screen attached to one end. The screen doesn't appear flexible enough to fold in half like a piece of paper, but it could bend into a tube.
The company also showed a video of a future concept, with a phone-sized device that opens up like a book, revealing a tablet-sized screen inside.
HOW IT WORKS: The screen uses organic light-emitting diodes, or OLEDs. Only a thin layer of these chemicals is needed to produce a bright, colorful screen. They're used in many Samsung phones already, though with glass screens. For the bendable phone, Samsung laid the chemicals over thin plastic instead of glass. That's a trick you can't pull off with liquid crystals in standard displays.

Sunday, 6 January 2013

A Tablet that doubles as wireless charging mat



Fulton Innovation comes to CES each year armed with the latest tricks in the field of wireless charging, and this year is no exception. Starting things out with a bang, the purveyor of all things Qi will be on-hand to demonstrate its newest feat: the ability to charge your Qi-compatible phone... on the back of a tablet. Indeed, your 7- to 10-inch slate may someday be able to double as its own wireless charging mat, allowing you to feed battery from your tablet to your smartphone just by holding the two devices back-to-back.
Additionally, Fulton promises to show off a multi-device charging platform capable of powering up two devices simultaneously. Even better, this surface can recognize and adapt to the needs of each particular product -- in other words, tablets and smartphones can charge together on the same pad, each device receiving the proper amount of juice. Check out the video to see a few ideas Fulton is bringing to the table this week, and fortunately we'll get to take a closer look at all of them soon.